054-2106470

A Rifle’s Journey

The story begins in 1941, when Yair, aged 18, guided a weapon buying expedition for the ‘Hagana’ to the deserts of Trans-Jordan. The guns were purchased from the Bedouins and smuggled into British-ruled Palestine. One of these rifles was manufactured in England and used during the Boar war. It had a broken butt held together with copper wire. An inscription was carved on the rifle’s butt: “Johanes Kruger, Transvaal, 1900”. The Bedouin said he had received the rifle from Laurence of Arabia, during the First World War. Two years later, when Yair enlisted into the British Army, he was sent to Egypt. There he was trained as a sapper to clear the minefields of El-Alamein. His partner was Johnny Kruger from South Africa. He was the namesake of his great uncle – a hero of the Boar war. The very same rifle was part of the family heritage. When the Boars had surrendered, the rifle was returned to the British. The story jumps to the 1948 War, in Jerusalem. One of the few guns assigned to the Israeli soldiers on the Katamon front, was Johanes Kruger’s.
The rifle connects three separate chapters of history. The story, which is based on Yair Goren’s memoire, is retold here in a visual rendition, blending new illustrations with period photographs.
It is best to view the story on a Desktop screen.
Link to the story

Moses Shapira’s Mt. Nebo

In 1873 Wilhelm Moses Shapira was at the center of an international scandal, when Moabite pottery figurines that he had sold to the Prussian government were proved to be fake. Ten years later he presented 15 manuscripts as the oldest version of the book of Deuteronomy. The parchments, found in the area of the Dead Sea, excited the public and scholars. Queen Victoria was willing to buy them for a million pounds. But in the fierce competition between the European imperialist powers, Shapira’s reputation as a forger was recalled. The manuscripts declared as fakes, driving the humiliated Shapira to suicide. The parchments were sold off as curious objects and later lost. Sixty years later, when the Dead Sea scrolls were discovered and authenticated, the main argument against the Shapira scrolls was annulled. Scholars continue to argue: where the manuscripts an impudent fraud or a missed opportunity for understanding the roots of the Bible.

The story of Shapira is retold here in a visual rendition – his burning aspiration for fame, his passion for knowledge and his personal tragedy…

It is best to view the story on a Desktop screen.
Link to the story

Remarks & Annotations

A Rifle’s Journey

The story begins in 1941, when Yair, aged 18, guided a weapon buying expedition for the ‘Hagana’ to the deserts of Trans-Jordan. The guns were purchased from the Bedouins and smuggled into British-ruled Palestine. One of these rifles was manufactured in England and used during the Boar war. It had a broken butt held together with copper wire. An inscription was carved on the rifle’s butt: “Johanes Kruger, Transvaal, 1900”. The Bedouin said he had received the rifle from Laurence of Arabia, during the First World War. Two years later, when Yair enlisted into the British Army, he was sent to Egypt. There he was trained as a sapper to clear the minefields of El-Alamein. His partner was Johnny Kruger from South Africa. He was the namesake of his great uncle – a hero of the Boar war. The very same rifle was part of the family heritage. When the Boars had surrendered, the rifle was returned to the British. The story jumps to the 1948 War, in Jerusalem. One of the few guns assigned to the Israeli soldiers on the Katamon front, was Johanes Kruger’s. The rifle connects three separate chapters of history. The story, which is based on Yair Goren’s memoire, is retold here in a visual rendition, blending new illustrations with period photographs.

Link to the story

Moses Shapira’s Mt. Nebo

In 1873 Wilhelm Moses Shapira was at the center of an international scandal, when Moabite pottery figurines that he had sold to the Prussian government were proved to be fake. Ten years later he presented 15 manuscripts as the oldest version of the book of Deuteronomy. The parchments, found in the area of the Dead Sea, excited the public and scholars. Queen Victoria was willing to buy them for a million pounds. But in the fierce competition between the European imperialist powers, Shapira’s reputation as a forger was recalled. The manuscripts declared as fakes, driving the humiliated Shapira to suicide. The parchments were sold off as curious objects and later lost. Sixty years later, when the Dead Sea scrolls were discovered and authenticated, the main argument against the Shapira scrolls was annulled. Scholars continue to argue: where the manuscripts an impudent fraud or a missed opportunity for understanding the roots of the Bible. The story of Shapira is retold here in a visual rendition – his burning aspiration for fame, his passion for knowledge and his personal tragedy…

Link to the story